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The Resource Was revolution inevitable? : turning points of the Russian Revolution, edited by Tony Brenton

Was revolution inevitable? : turning points of the Russian Revolution, edited by Tony Brenton

Label
Was revolution inevitable? : turning points of the Russian Revolution
Title
Was revolution inevitable?
Title remainder
turning points of the Russian Revolution
Statement of responsibility
edited by Tony Brenton
Contributor
Author
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • " Communism's rise and eventual fall in Eastern Europe is one of the great stories of the 20th century. Within this context, the Russian Revolution's role and legacy overshadows all else. In Was Revolution Inevitable?, former British Ambassador to Russia Sir Tony Brenton has gathered essays by leading historians to trace the events that led to the overthrow of the Tsarist regime and to pinpoint moments when those events could have unfolded in a drastically different way. What would the world be like had Fanny Kaplan succeeded in assassinating Vladimir Lenin in 1918? What if the Bolsheviks had never imposed the brutal "War Communism" initiatives that devastated the Russian peasants? What if Rasputin had talked Nicholas II out of involvement in World War One, which effectively led to the Revolution and sealed the demise of the Romanov dynasty? Preeminent scholars, including Orlando Figes, Richard Pipes, Douglas Smith, and Martin Sixsmith, ruminate on these questions and many others, assembling a series of pivotal moments that reveal what might have gone differently, and, if so, what the repercussions would have been. The contributors take a variety of approaches, from imagining an alternate history, to carefully studying a precarious moment of contingency, to disproving popular imagined alternatives. All of the chapters, however, shed light on Lenin's rise to power and the proliferation of his agenda, while assessing the influence of the revolution's pivotal moments on Russian-and global-politics. Provocative and illuminating, Was Revolution Inevitable? provides an in-depth exploration of the conflict that for nearly a century has shaped world history. The Russian Revolution put totalitarian communism into power, fueled Nazism and the Second World War, and forged one of the West's greatest antagonists. Here is a book that scrutinizes how the past, present, and future of global history could have been remarkably different had the events of 1917 unfolded differently and in the process deepens our understanding of what did happen and why. "--
  • "Communism's rise and eventual fall in Eastern Europe is one of the most important political conflicts of the 20th century. However, the infamous legacy of the Russian Revolution often overshadows the events of the 1917 uprising itself-the complications of which speak volumes to the resulting international turmoil. In Historically Inevitable, former British Ambassador to Russia Sir Tony Brenton compiles essays by top Russian historians-including Orlando Figes, Richard Pipes, and Dominic Lieven-to trace the events and ideology that overthrew the Tsarist regime and evaluate the true implications of the revolution. Formatted chronologically, the essays knit together the compelling narrative of the Russian Revolution, compiling a series of snapshots that capture the multifaceted nature of the uprising and, for the first time, present a counter-factual analysis of what might have gone differently. The course of the narrative takes into account the importance of various key players, such as Grigory Rasputin and Tsar Nicholas II, as well as the intricacies of the time and place. These interwoven details shed light on Vladimir Lenin's rise to power and the proliferation of his agenda, and evaluation of this process along with the effects of the revolution are used to evaluate contemporary Russian politics. Fusing the facts of the conflict with its accompanying drama, Historically Inevitable provides an in-depth exploration of a conflict that shaped our current geopolitical sphere. Thorough and engaging, the work untangles the complications of the past to help understand present and future events"--
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
947.084/1
Index
index present
LC call number
DK265
LC item number
.W339 2017
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Label
Was revolution inevitable? : turning points of the Russian Revolution, edited by Tony Brenton
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Donald Crawford
  • April-July 1917, Enter Lenin
  • Sean McMeekin
  • August 1917, The Kornilov Affair: A tragedy of errors
  • Richard Pipes
  • October 1917, The 'harmless drunk': Lenin and the October Insurrection
  • Orlando Figes
  • January 1918, The short life and early death of Russian democracy: The Duma and the Constituent Assembly
  • Tony Brenton
  • July 1918, Rescuing the Tsar and his family
  • 1900-1920, Foreign intervention: The long view
  • Edvard Radzinsky
  • August 1918, Fanny Kaplan's attempt to kill Lenin
  • Martin Sixsmith
  • November 1918, Sea change in the Civil War
  • Evan Mawdsley
  • March 1920, The fate of the Soviet countryside
  • Erik C. Landis
  • February 1922, The "Bolshevik Reformation"
  • Catriona Kelly -- 1917-1922, The rise of Leninism: The death of political pluralism in the post-revolutionary Bolshevik Party/
  • Richard Sakwa -- Afterword, Lenin and yesterday's utopia
  • Dominic Lieven
  • Tony Brenton
  • September 1911
  • The assassination of Stolypin
  • Simon Dixon
  • June 1914, Grigory Rasputin and the outbreak of World War I
  • Douglas Smith
  • March 1917, The Last Tsar
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xvii, 364 pages
Isbn
9780190658915
Isbn Type
(paperback)
Lccn
2016033658
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)959034046
  • 726814
  • (OCoLC)ocn959034046
  • 726814
Label
Was revolution inevitable? : turning points of the Russian Revolution, edited by Tony Brenton
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Donald Crawford
  • April-July 1917, Enter Lenin
  • Sean McMeekin
  • August 1917, The Kornilov Affair: A tragedy of errors
  • Richard Pipes
  • October 1917, The 'harmless drunk': Lenin and the October Insurrection
  • Orlando Figes
  • January 1918, The short life and early death of Russian democracy: The Duma and the Constituent Assembly
  • Tony Brenton
  • July 1918, Rescuing the Tsar and his family
  • 1900-1920, Foreign intervention: The long view
  • Edvard Radzinsky
  • August 1918, Fanny Kaplan's attempt to kill Lenin
  • Martin Sixsmith
  • November 1918, Sea change in the Civil War
  • Evan Mawdsley
  • March 1920, The fate of the Soviet countryside
  • Erik C. Landis
  • February 1922, The "Bolshevik Reformation"
  • Catriona Kelly -- 1917-1922, The rise of Leninism: The death of political pluralism in the post-revolutionary Bolshevik Party/
  • Richard Sakwa -- Afterword, Lenin and yesterday's utopia
  • Dominic Lieven
  • Tony Brenton
  • September 1911
  • The assassination of Stolypin
  • Simon Dixon
  • June 1914, Grigory Rasputin and the outbreak of World War I
  • Douglas Smith
  • March 1917, The Last Tsar
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xvii, 364 pages
Isbn
9780190658915
Isbn Type
(paperback)
Lccn
2016033658
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)959034046
  • 726814
  • (OCoLC)ocn959034046
  • 726814

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